MR. MORBID & MELPH (UNRELEASED DEMONS)

 

Rap 4 heads—an ambiguous though somehow fitting description. Even as the phrase would better describe  a release like Heavy Metal Kings, this is neither bad for the same.

Mr. Morbid and Melph have struck the Rap structure with a magic wand such that whatever twinkles off is brilliance and lusciousness. For the benefit of heinous views coupled with respect for decadence—the heads administered to ought giving a closer look to the cynicisms chipping off loose like fiery splinters from heavily welded metal. this is not Horrorcore or sensitive emo bullshit in its self immersed efforts to spite and dispute the self. rather, it is a cry echoed in the cover—what they wish of their identities is the portrait the musical canvas displays—demons throbbing with pulses of unhinged feelings.

Melph appears to be the producer lending flaps to Mr. Morbid’s laid back —often sleek—flow; around a few spits by Mr. Morbid. This EP works so well it could be listened from any track as the first that mere putting down becomes an irresistible matter of choice. Fucking perfect length. E.N.D. dwells on an electric guitar that’s something leering into what an alternative Metal band may have to offer—not that it’s bad, for its somewhat tasty effort.

Unreleased Demons found an outlet upon the intersection of a duct that clicks—if not falling in place like jigsaw. Do not hesitate upon this—or fuck, it’s rap 4 heads.

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RUPTURED BIRTH (TRANSMUTANT)

  Canada has seen an upsurge of great Death Metal bands—especially tech death. With such laid groundwork for expected high repute in the country’s metal exports, it would be highly safe to suggest listenership to a band from the mentioned North American soil. Inadvertently, it seems the bar was set too high by the predecessors, given the potential acumen of Ruptured Birth and a failure to completely allure.

  Since this is Brutal Death Metal and not much should be expected—a terrible precept by itself—as it denounces and dents better instigators. Suppurating a slam catch-all which make the band’s overhead additions seem like a joke. If anything, Unnatural Selection is the best way forward for Ruptured Birth—by virtue of expressing this song. Saprogenic coalesces a rabies sample that admonishes any belief of anything great forthcoming; a not so promising pace-setter it would rather be satisfying to listen to Katalepsy‘s Rabid as a better exchange. The whole idea of the song is taking the brutal death metal usual, but palely—by huge repetition of breakdowns and the lead work. The shrieks are far from saving grace by point of eccentrically aplombing non stand-out growls. A basis that falls upon Strogg once it sparks flashy Rings of Saturn sides, furthered along the release.

  Hurtling, very much on the side of miss upon few hits like parts of Blood Siren—where it is catch off-guard; repeat the grabber. Brutal Death Metal that wants to slam possessively, with ties to tech death, but still wants to have a demeanor which pulls off like it owes Deathcore its existence. This time straddling has cost somebody—good thing it is a brutal death metal band?

  The Shape threatens to parlay its sample the Craniotomy serial killer style—however, checking on sample length. Rhythm goes a bit fuzzy compacting annihilating no-frills riffs. Such fuzziness heads straight into the next track. Once with textured solos that overrun ears with technical patterns plus slam accentuations. Samples start to teeter on overload. Taking on a sharp experimental offset is the finisher—or assorted phase before bonus tracks that might well be enjoyed from their original EP—provides the only substance to hold on to.

  This is no different from what has already been said concerning horror and science fiction intermingles. An art that is equal to lack of identity well represents the content it helps wrap. Horrific sci-fi or science fictional horror—if it has enough science orientation to be gauging futures. What Ruptured Birth espouse is non confounded footing in gory medicinal havoc which would matter less had they encapsulated it with brisk butchery.

HAUNTED WOMEN: THE BEST SUPERNATURAL TALES BY AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS (EDITED BY ALFRED BENDIXEN)

  Anagrams—all the life’s wisdom can be found in anagrams! A lot can be done with a phrase or a sentence, but only the structural competence matters—further within that restriction is upholding meaning related to the words being anagramed. The less to no repetition of words in a phrase, the better a shot at it. Anagrams allow for so much wordplay among the meticulous homophones—here puns become trite and appear like child’s play. Taking them this further was a well worth self-challenge beyond previous music reviews—I don’t mind my language. . . .

  These are handpicked phrases from each story of the collectionnon machine aided re-workings.
 
HAUNTED WOMEN: THE BEST SUPERNATURAL TALES BY AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS 
WHET RUE YEARN EBBS: TRITE SPATIAL HOUNDS WREST MATERNAL ACUMEN
  1. The Amber Gods (Harriet Prescott Spofford)

ALL THOSE VERY GNOSTIC DEITIES WHO ASSISTED AT CREATION.
SISTER COLOURS TOO AIDED WISHES SETTING THY ACT ELEVATION.

      Story First.        Story  last.
        —Flower the peach     —Astra Castra, Numen Lumen
 
—IT IS COLDER THAN IT WAS.I THINK I WILL GO TO SLEEP.
PLEA—TIE LAIC TWIN IN. ROOK HAS THIS WILED—GLOTTIS.
  2. The True Story of Guenver (Elizabeth Stuart Phelps)

SONG AND STORY, LIFE AND DEATH ARE SO CRUEL TO A WOMAN.
WAN ALMOST DETHRONED, OAR FELONY AS TANGO AIDS CURE.

  3. The Ghost in the Cap’n Brown House (Harriet Beecher Stowe)

BUT YOUR GRANDMA SHE BELIEVED IN THE GHOST, AND SO DID LADY LOTHROP.
GHOULY MANSION HOUSED GRIT IDLY. STAB ADVENT PROD ETHER DAB

  4. The Yellow Wallpaper (Charlotte Perkins Gilman)

THIS PAPER LOOKS TO ME AS IF IT KNEW WHAT A VICIOUS INFLUENCE IT HAD!
I WAIT FATEFUL ANT EKES I PREPONE VACATED KIN WHICH IS MOOT SOUL HOIST!

  5. The Story of a Day (Grace King)

SUCH A SPLENDID BLACK HEAD THAT HAD JUST YIELDED BREATH!
ENDURED BULK HATH JADED A HASTY DEATH! BILLED CAST CHIPS

  6. The Little Room (Madelene Yale Wynne)

AND ALL THIS NEVER EXISTED EXCEPT IN HER IMAGINATION?
THEN EMANATING SERIAL INCEPTIONS HID EXTRA IDLE VEXES?

  7. Her Letters (Kate Chopin)

HE VANISHED SILENTLY; SEEMINGLY INTO SOME INKY INFATHOMABLE SPACE.
HEAD ON; FAINT NOSEY HALE BELYING HIS MOSTLY SKIVED IMMINENT ESCAPE.

  8. The Foreigner (Sarah Orne Jewett)

I ALWAYS RUN OF AN IDEA THAT THE SEA KNOWS ANGER THESE NIGHTS AND GETS FULL O’ FIGHT.
HEED A SHALLOW FUNK HUGE WAGES SAT AT INTENDN’T TO INGRAIN FAITHLESS GHOST FEAR.

  9. Luella Miller (Mary E. Wilkins Freeman)

SHE’S GOT STRENGTH ENOUGH TO HANG ONTO OTHER FOLKS TILL SHE KILLS ‘EM.
GHOULS STROKE H’NGES FOR THE NTH TIME TONIGHT TELLS HEAL SONG’S LOOK.

  10. The Lost Ghost (Mary E. Wilkins Freeman)
SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN VERY BEAUTIFUL IF SHE HAD NOT BEEN SO DREADFUL.
BRIDE WOUNDED BY EERIE HALF LOVE FUELS VESSEL AND BEAU HUNT.

  11. The Bell in the Fog (Gertrude Atherton)

HE SPENT A HAUNTED NIGHT, BUT THE NEXT DAY STRANGER HAPPENINGS BEGAN.
EXTEND AUGUR HANDY BEINGS HATH BESET SIGN STRAIGHTEN BATHING PATENT.

  12. The Fullness of Life (Edith Wharton)

PERHAPS NOW I SHALL REALLY KNOW WHAT IT IS TO LIVE.
WHITELIST KNELL AVAILS WORRY WHIPS ON SHAPE A LOT.

  13. Pomegranate Seed (Edith Wharton)
OH, YOU NEEDN’T IMAGINE THAT ANYTHING CAN EVER FRIGHTEN ME AGAIN!
ANY ONE MEAN TACT, OUGHT MENDING THY HIGH FINITE TANG AN’ REVERIE!
  Since I don’t have mild triskaidekaphobia, I regress from overlooking everything else to pinpoint 13‘s loom in my life—it’s two pithy stories, three outstanding pieces, one obsessive em dash shoaler.

DOPPELGANGERS XXV

  Before ExodusTempo of the Damned cover was a Weird Tales pulp mag edition with an accompanying illustration—if the skeletal could harness temporal legions—wreathing under a witch’s cloak; perhaps. A leap to what Eddie might develop into under a natural extension towards Thrash—horns and atrophying skin. Into the temple.
Joseph Krucher

Jowita Kamińska-Peruzzi

PETER HAINING—TERROR! A HISTORY OF HORROR ILLUSTRATIONS FROM THE PULP MAGAZINES

  The pulp magazines were the launching pad of some of the cornerstone names in the horror, fantasy, and science fiction among other genres today. Their popularity relied heavily on illustrations, and like many publications,—including novels—they are indispensable and as decisive on the importance of publication to readers as they are an influence on their biases/preferences. Much less the same thing that has had certain dictations upon my reading habits/purchases over the years and looking forward to to depictions as a young-in to accompany long gone favourites. 

  This is a compilation of illustrations the authorPeter Hainingdeems important to the horror and to an extent, fantasy pulp magazines—where some tended to cater but not limited to bothacross the span of the 19th to 20th Century. Showcased are various artists and most are engravings as the printing press gained traction. Other styles of illustrations were later incorporated at length, replacing engravings. Some artists were impressive enough to be featured twice or more. It absolutely is an art lover’s cherish. I had a copy from a library that had some pages plucked, and some missing sections that had been cut-out by some dumb fucking moron. Fucking retard wouldn’t understand this might not be available in a hundred mile raduis. PoS!
  Here are some of The Mad Mane Machine’s choice illustrations from the compilation. It’s fantastic to have a new—old—great artist to uphold. That is when it resumes drawing.
 Experiments in the lost art of poisoning
 Steam-powered robot (cover)
Invaders from the infinite
 
 The bride of death
 
   Nor moon by night
Excellent cover by Hanes Boke

  Having book perusers serves as the prelude pictures with details about each illustration. Much more like Space Bestiary from GURPS, with its various artist perception of exo-monsters and a much longer description. TMMM envisions Groot as World Tree! The wonderful chronology is a mesmerizing work to anybody interested in that aspect of literature’s history.

DOPPELGANGERS XXIV

 Judith beheading Holofernes has various depictions. Here are two of manythe first is the one The Mad Mane Machine presumed the most brutal. Coming second is another that appeared in a horror pulp magazine, even though the maiden seems to be doing the severing herepure Victorian era, grandeur done away with.
Artemisia Gentileschi
Mary Byfield (for ‘Penny Dreadful’ magazine The Ghost 1983)

ESPECTROSTATIC (SKELETACTICAL)

 

  Firing up in a shimmering way. On pointers with dishevling relationships with radiation bursts. Anticipate a wake of reanimations and impending consternation as the blasted astronauts regain unlife. All those years of inertia that have molten any memory of flesh are gone now as a plague unanticipated enlists itself.
  Unlife refines itself with consequential drums pockmarking the synth loops. Stellar outstretch soundtracks to a dreadful reprise. Gear shifting melody with tosses of Synthwave. So what makes this punk?—if not recalcitrations of electro- and synth-wave polyphonics in a much balanced but out there way. Dangling aside Synthwave‘s super cine feel. Apart from Fuzgati‘s electropunk, it’s the exact opposite of what Fuzgati does, yet the the name might suggest otherwise. Or what the latter should be emulating.
  Those drum hits. That is what its moments are, amid electro key touches as the EP clashes with closure time. Certainly indecipherable culminations; ponderings that lurk opportunistically among the tints of dystopia. A kind of watch-the-space-explode anticipations and ruminations. Blipping out from the upsurging space sargassso. Communication frozen. Dashing Horrorwave.